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The small armchair is finished

The first piece of fabric to be secured was the bit covering the seat and the front of the chair. Then I moved onto the arms.

After securing the sides of the chair cover over the arms and underneath the chair frame with staples, I grabbed part of this piece of fabric from the back of the chair to pull it tightly and fix it. There wasn’t quite enough of the fabric to staple securely, so I tacked a piece on (the bit you can see me holding) and sewed a length of cord onto a very tiny piece to help me yank it through from the front.

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One of the next jobs was to sew the two sections together with an invisible ladder stitch into the seam with the piping. You can’t see my stitches, can you? That’s because they’re invisible.

I may only use ladder stitch ever again on every project from now on. I have grown to love it.

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In order to get a straight seam along the back of the chair, I used a length of thick cardboard tape, which I stapled to the top of the chair. I covered it with a bit of polyester to smooth out the edges before flipping the fabric over and revealing a beautiful seam in which all of the squares in the pattern lined up (this took a very long time to get right).

I then ladder stitched the back panel to the chair using a curved needle and working a little way down one side, then switching to the other so that the seams were even and the tension equal on both sides. I had to use three panels of fabric for the back panel, to use up bits I had left over. I am very pleased that I was able to match these squares up too.

After having secured the cover (I know I make this sound easy; it actually took a lot of hours and much unpicking of staples and re-stretching of fabric), it was time for the fun jobs of making a piped cushion with welts for the seat of the chair and a mini piped scatter cushion for my son’s back (and stapling black bottoming onto the, er, bottom)…

 

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It's finished! It just needs its feet.

It’s finished! It just needs its feet.

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Making a cushion for the seat

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A reminder of how it used to look

An upholstery project for an evening

I’ve had this large blanket box hanging around for ages, winking at me and flaunting its faded fabric and stained wood.

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So I decided to take the lid off…:

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…remove the panel from inside the lid and recover it in new fabric:

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I now have a blanket box that matches the little armchair I am re-upholstering. All it needs now is to be repainted. That will take me longer than an evening, but be assured, a blog post charting its progress will surely follow! 

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Beginning to upholster the little armchair

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I have had a few weeks away from upholstery so I could concentrate on getting underway with some Christmas presents (no photos of those yet, for obvious reasons!), but this week I have got on pleasingly well with my son’s chair.

Firstly, I stripped the child’s armchair of all of its original fabric, removing as many staples as possible.

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Next, I tucked a piece of the new fabric into the seat, making some snips at the front of the seat so that the fabric would fit around the wood of the chair’s arm. The tails at the back and front are long enough to staple onto the wood of the frame later.

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After that, a piece of fabric went over the back of the chair, again, with strategic snips around the back of the arm so that it could be wedged neatly around the foam.

This piece was tricky as I had to ensure that the lines of the pattern were all straight enough so that the arms looked even.

No idea why I chose patterned fabric for my first upholstery project. I have no excuses as I was warned.

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Here’s the back, stapled securely with pleated curves.

It looks very uneven here as my main concern was to get the line of the pattern straight across the top of the chair, while pulling the fabric tightly enough so that there would be no sagging later.

You can also see bits of fabric poking through from the seat piece and also from the bottom of this back piece.

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This picture shows you where I have to work when I am not in the workshop: sharing table space with my little boy and his toys. He knows by now not to touch any pointy or bladed things.

I made piping from scrappy bits of fabric joined together at 45 degree angles.

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Here’s the piping casing all pinned and ready to sew. I really needed a zipper foot attachment for this job so that I could get my line of sewing as close to the piping as possible. My zipper foot didn’t fit the sewing machine, though, so I just used a straight stitch foot, wedging the piping cord underneath the foot in rather an unsafe and uncontrollable manner.

Seems to have done the job.

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The exciting bit – sewing the piping into the arm covers. I worked from the top right corner of the arm first, sewing straight down to the bottom of the chair.

The next bit was quite awkward. I had to sew each section of the cover individually, measuring (very carefully) each time. It wasn’t enough to make sure that the cover fitted the arm and the corner was perfect, but I also had to continually check that all the squares of the pattern lined up and also that grain of the squares faced in the right direction.

I found myself asking again why I had not chosen a plain piece of fabric. Oh, and there was also a little swearing here, too.

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The finished arm pieces are now all ready to be stapled into place. I’m very pleased with myself and looking forward to tacking it all down.

My boy keeps saying “when are you going to mend my chair?”

Shouldn’t take too long now!

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Stay out of the sitting room

Stay out of the sitting room!

This quilt has taken over my life (and my home). It’s not the most practical of hobbies when you have a full-time job, a two year-old and a two-bedroom flat.

Oh, and can you see an ugly, small children’s armchair in the background that’s in desperate need of being re-upholstered? That’s a future project.

Better finish this quilt first, though.

Redesigned By M

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